Throughout Justin Chon Ms. Purple, characters gradually reveal their histories. Kasie (Tiffany Chu) works a shit job as a karaoke hostess in L.A.’s Koreatown, keeping handsy drunks company so she can afford in-home care for her dying, bedridden father, Young-Il (James Kang). When his nurse quits, she calls upon her estranged brother, Carey (Teddy Lee), and the two talk about the past, giving us a sense of who they were as they pull things like an old keyboard out of a dusty closet. Flashbacks offer glimpses of other, not necessarily happier, times, like the trio showing up on the doorstep of the kids’ absentee mother, or a 15-year-old Carey running away after a fight with Young-Il gets physical. Chon may intend for these characters to have real, meaningful pasts, but any sense of believable history is drowned out by clanking plot machinations that grow too loud to ignore. Ms. Purple works best at its most reserved. In Kasie’s quiet contemplation, Chu reveals the weight upon her character’s shoulders through body language and tired eyes. Kasie stares wistfully at palm trees against a pink sky, and when she reconciles with Carey, the two simply fall into old patterns. They have th...