This is the flagship post in our dairy-free probiotics section, which I will continue to update. Finding dairy-free probiotic supplements used to be a challenge, but these days there are quite a few options. Technically, probiotics themselves are free of all food. They’re live bacteria and yeasts that occur naturally in our digestive tracts. But two primary food issues can arise with probiotic supplements. Supplements often contain fillers, binders, and other types of ingredients to bulk them up and create a functional pill. Getting live bacteria to our guts without a transport system would be next to impossible. But these ingredients can include food, like dairy. Most of the time it’s lactose (milk sugar), but other dairy ingredients might be used. Nonetheless, the ingredients should be clearly visible on the label. And the probiotics themselves must be grown on a medium. This is often dairy. The bacteria is removed from the medium, and in theory shouldn’t be problematic for most people with a dairy issue. The bacteria itself doesn’t contain properties, like proteins, of the dairy it was grown on. However, there can be a concern for trace cross-contamination, and vegans might ...